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tv   Morning Joe  MSNBC  August 24, 2011 6:00am-9:00am EDT

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time for a couple quick e-mails. >> i'm up rolling my eyes because of the tremor you experienced. we call that strerngt a yawner up here in alaska. >> we're not used to that. we on the east coast are a bunch of whimps. how about one more. >> i live in an apartment with art students. i woken to breaking glass, exotic odors. i cannot sleep until i know what that is. >> it's weed. art students, exotic odors, that's weed. that answers that question.
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"morning joe" starts right now. ♪ >> a magnitude 5.9 earthquake, they happen on a regular basis in california. the earth's crust is very broken up so the shaking is felt in a small area. here, we are not at the edge of a tectonic plate where they are crashing against each other. we have very old rocks. they ring like a bell. the energy gets transmitted e fish enly over a broad area. >> good morning, it's wednesday, august 24th. with us, political analyst, visiting professor, harold ford, jr., katty kay and howard dean. down in washington, nbc news
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correspondent and the host of andrea mitchell. she was on the air when the quake struck. what happened? >> everything started moving. it sounded like a freight train. the desk was moving up and down. i didn't know what was going on. the technical manager said it's an earthquake, get out of here. i said can i finish my show? they said no. as you know, there are a lot of lights and stuff overhead that can come crashing down. we are on the third floor of a three-story building. we went down the steps. as we were going down the stairs, dialling the control room to try to pick it up on the cell phone and get back on the air. >> i was watching your show at the time. i saw you go off. as you went to break, i saw the camera shake again.
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i thought the camera man was drinking again. >> that is a problem here. >> we felt it to some extent. let's turn to catty kay. how big of wimps are we for acting like this. >> not wimps at all. >> the walls shook in my apartment. >> i'm a bit of an earthquake snob. i lived in japan for three years. they have serious quakes in japan. i was in a hotel room on the ninth floor. it felt nice, like a massage. >> oh, i knew you were going to diminish this for us in some way. >> harold, did you feel it? >> i didn't feel it. i was in westchester. my wife felt it. >> did you? >> i was on the ninth floor
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building. i was on the phone, i said holy blank, not permitted on the show. i said there's an earthquake here. i was in an earthquake in vermont, a tiny one and l.a. it was a little more swaying back. >> we confess to being wimps. you feel the walls shaking. >> new york was minimal. in washington, it was actually damage. >> yeah. >> virginia there was damage. >> an dee dreaandrea, i guess t washington monument sauz damage. >> that is the real story. it's going to be closed indefinitely because of damage. that is sad. we have all these visitors coming this weekend for the opening of martin luther king memorial, i have been working on interviews and going down there. we have a dinner kicking off the dedication tonight. we have so much going on here.
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the hurricane has got everybody's attention focused. then luke russert was at the national cathedral where he basically grew up. it is such a tragedy to those of us who love that building. the sight of so many state funerals, events, memorials. they were making plans for the memorial for 9/11, where president bush and the former presidents went right after 9/11. that's when the earthquake hit and they lost three of the four spires. that's a serious problem. >> it's a real shame. >> none of the buildings on the east coast were built for this. they were built 200 and 300 years ago. this is not in the plan. unlike japan. >> schools back in d.c., i brought up my 5-year-old who is in first grade. she said it was so cool. we got recess. the upside.
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>> the schools are not closed today. the other serious point is the nuclear plant of the 104 nuclear plants in this country, recently a study said that is the seventh least safe or best protected against earthquakes. it's protected for up to 6.1. it did trip, which is what it's supposed to do and shut down automatically. everything is safe there. it was right at the epicenter. there's still that question because east coast reactors are not as well protected and defended against an earthquake. we have an ageing nuclear system here. >> harold, we had the same outcome in new york, a couple reactors shut down and went to generator power. it's good news they are working. >> you have to call the mayor
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and applaud all law enforcement that handled it quickly. i have not seen reports, is there a sense in the local papers about the damage to the cathedral and if it will prevept service that is will take place in the next few weeks? >> i don't think it will prevent services. it is serious. the stone masons have been working for decades to finish is cathedral. that work is now ruined. the pinnacle is crumbled. >> i went to the ridgewood, new jersey public high school. we didn't have a lot of national cathedrals. >> we welcome you at our church. >> we are all safe and sound. libya, a defiant moammar gadhafi calling on supporters to come to tripoli and fight back. his regime will either win or
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become martyrs. they made the remarks during a local radio station broadcast. they found neither gadhafi or his family are inside. the complex had been destroyed by nato air strikes. his departure from the facility was a tactical move. there was no idea as to gadhafi's location. he's toured the city and does not believe they are in danger. the regime can survive for months and possibly years. gadhafi loyalists will turn tripoli, in his words, into a death trap for the opposition. richard engel made his way inside the compound where he found the rebels with amazing reporting. here is richard. >> reporter: we approached the compound unsure if it really had
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fallen. this is one of the main gates of the compound. rebels are going inside. they are clearly going to fight. they are moving in their heavy weapons. the rebels took gadhafi's forbidden city. the loyalists inside ran away. today, he lost his compound and his country. where was gadhafi? rebels scoured the grounds. they fought gadhafi loyalists. they fire. the loyalists are gone. gadhafi remains at large. the leader of libya for now 42 years is now a fugitive and no longer considered in xand by his people. >> richard engel reporting there. 35 international journalists are being held by forces loyal to gadhafi and not allowed to
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leave. heavy gunfire can be heard about the hotel. that's a scary situation for international journalists. they were brought in by gadhafi, now not able to leave the hotel. >> it shows the gadhafi forces are trying to hold on to some forms of communication. who knows, using journalists for the last hold out while they are in tripoli. matthew price is in there and an nbc producer as well, i think. journalists are going to want to be out there covering the story. whatever they are going through. it's been interesting the last couple days, it showed there's a good piece in the new york times about how we had information and disinformation. gadhafi himself for the last 42 years spread misinformation. the rebels have done this to some extent claiming they have taken places they haven't. then it turns out the son of gadhafi is wondering around the
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hotel. it's tricky. we learned during the iranian revolution to be careful what we are hearing, what kind of information we are getting and how reliable it is. where they are in control and where they are not in control. it's going to be tricky to find out what the rebels do with the gadhafi loyalists. how they handle the next few days, the next few weeks is going to give us a big indication of what kind of libya we are looking at. >> we have baghdad bob. tripoli will be turned into a death trap as moammar gadhafi is nowhere to be found. what is the next chapter? what happens next, andrea. >> finding the fugitive gadhafi. finding him because he remains a symbol for the final resistors.
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asserting civilian control. the rebel leaders are trying to head to tripoli to put their stamp on the capital city. it's an important symbolic moment. the u.n. and u.s. treasury. as we found in 2006 when there was a brief moment, i was there with bill richardson, the envoy. they were trying to rip the sanctions to spur a possible reengagement. it's difficult. once they are in place, legally it's very difficult to take the steps, to agree to release money. they don't want to have exposure legally down the road. they found $30 billion in assets. only 10% are liquid assets, then reduce it to what they can get their hands on. they are trying to get $1 billion or $1.5 billion to get started. >> the hunt goes on for gadhafi.
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the 2012 presidential race. former florida governor, jeb bush, a guy a lot of republican people wish would run. this morning, republicans going too far with their criticism of president obama. here is governor bush on fox news. >> i think the president means well. his policies have failed. nothing wrong with that. it's politics. to stop there and say i'm going to win because i'm against what is going on. you have to win with purpose if you want to make the changes. you have to persuade. you can't just be against the president. he's made a situation that was bad, worse. he is deserving of criticism of that. he's not deserving of the criticism of everything up the chain. i think when you ascribe bad moments, it's wrong. it turns off people that want solutions. i think it's early to be
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dissatisfied with the candidates. they will start staking out positionings that are responsible and forward leaning and positive and hopeful and optimistic. as that happens, i think people will start migrating. >> you are not running right now? >> what do you mean right now? is that a trick question? i'm not running. >> governor dean, if his last name were not bush as we look at the tracking poll numbers, 38% approval rating, if his last name were not bush, would he be running for president now? >> i have no idea. he would be a good candidate. he's very conservative. he doesn't have the kind of firy, in your face stuff that's over the top that turns off independents. as you say, if his last name were not bush, he would be a strong candidate. >> what about the message from jeb bush? >> more important than his
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message was his tone. >> yeah. >> he shared what a lot of republicans and i would argue some independents feel about president obama. i think the president will turn it around. there are progressives and liberals who are disappointed. his tone was so positive. i don't think he's out of this race. there's a plan for him or christie or someone. his broad dissatisfaction with the republican field. you have to get the trajectory moving in the right direction. the republicans are dissatisfied because of what jeb bush said there. their candidates are too negative. they blame president obama for everything from cold coffee in the morning to their kids being sick. they blame him for everything. it's funny, the public will not give the president credit for libya. these are libyans leading the
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effort. all though there's ambiguity and uncertainty, i think all of those points are accurate. to have the u.s. in the background, to have libyan rebels leading the effort is a positive thing for this country and the faith and kind of politics in the middle east for years to come. >> how about jeb bush's message. to ascribe bad motives is not helpful. winning independents in the general election, he's talking michele bachmann and rick perry. >> probably rick perry given the bad blood between perry and the bush family. i met with jeb bush, i said if your name was anything else would you be running. he said he was proud of the bush name. he hasn't ruled out running but he hasn't ruled out being on
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"american idol" either. you got rid of the nasty monarchy a couple hundred years ago. he realizes having three bush presidents could be an odd thing in a country of 300 billion people. he's thoughtful on a range of issues from education to immigration. i wonder if his policies on immigration where he's got a strong vote. he's done a lot for hispanic students. you wonder if he's too moderate for republicans. too unred meatish for the republicans. he said there's no bush-perry problem. the bushes have no problem with perry. >> are you buying that, andrea? >> i'm not buying that but i am buying jeb bush. i think he shows, in that interview his strengths, his
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tone, the approach. he's conservative and straight ties. the latino community, florida a great starery under jeb bush. i think he will be a candidate. >> you are not buying him as candidate. we'll get an update from richard engel. former washington, d.c. mayor adrian fenty tina brown and jeremy. first, todd santos with a check on the forecast and a look at hurricane irene. todd. >> thanks so much, willie. looking across the bahamas, under the gun from a category 2 storm. 1-mile-per-hour more and you jump categories. it's going to take until friday to exit the northern bahamas. there's a look at the track.
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it will intensify to a cat 3 by later today or tomorrow. notice the track especially through saturday and sunday. andrea mitchell mentioned it could affect the mlk dedication with the monument. we'll talk more about other impacts, potential impacts across the coastline. you're watching "morning joe" brewed by starbucks.
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i was worried at first, but you have to go about your life, right? >> it didn't concern me much at all to be honest. it's unfortunate these things
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happen. >> cut out his tongue? there are 100 easier ways to kill dave. believe me, i've made a list. >> when he's walking ahead of me, i think one good push. >> i have been putting bleach in his coffee for five years. he won't die. >> reaction to jihadist threats against david letterman. the district attorney dismissed the sexual assault case against the imf chief, dominique straus khan. his attorneys said they are glad the matter is over. >> unless you, yourself have been accused falsely of a serious crime you did not commit, it's impossible to understand the full measure of relief that he felt today. it's a horrific nightmare that
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thank god has now gone away. >> the attorney for the accuser says his client will pursue a civil trial. there's speculation as to whether or not strauss khan could get back into politics. any hope for him there? >> my sense is the french think it's over for him. the image of him in handcuffs is not good. there's a high number of french women who say what it's done, for years we have had to put up with sexual harassment at work. we had to be silent about it. everybody accepted it. they say the strauss-khan case changed that.
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there's a new attitude toward sexual harassment of women. he would never get the female vote in france. whatever happened in that room, he now symbolizes something that was rotton in the french workplace for women. >> guilty of being a creep is bad enough for some people. let's turn to politico. jim is the executive editor with a look at the playbook. how are you doing after the earthquake? >> good. >> you hanging in there? >> i'm hanging in there. >> you have brave people there. let's talk 2012. the money race is on. how do the numbers look for both parties as we head into 2012? >> republicans are worried. when you look at the big fund raising committee for the democrats and republicans, the democrats are outraising republicans. you were talking earlier about
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the poll number, the gallup number. obama at 38%. the race for the senate is very much in play for republicans. it worries them they are not doing better with fund raising for the house and senate. they control the house and they still are not raising more money than their democratic opponents. there's different explanations. president obama controls the white house therefore they have all this clout and access to donors. the truth is, usually when you control the house, you have a big edge and you are able to get the corporate money back into the republican fold. they have to fix that if they want to keep control of the house. >> is it that there's not energy behind them now? is it too early? what are they thinking? >> it's both. they expected a surge from corporations. there's uncertainty about where power will be in two years. that money hasn't flowed as quickly as they hoped.
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there's frustration with leaders and campaign committees. people feel they could do a better job with the leaders at the nrcc at the house fund raising arms. it's usually a variety of factors. the economy being down doesn't help. >> we have heard mark arubio's name being thrown around. last night, he spoke. let's listen. >> americans in the 20th century built here. we built here the richest, most prosperous nation in the world. today, we have built for ourselves a government that not only the richest and most prosperous nation in the face of the earth can fund or afford to pay for. a tragic accomplishment. >> bill crystal has been pushing
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him. is he the right guy? >> if there's a safe bet, he will be the vice presidential candidate regardless of who is on the top of the ticket. people don't feel romney, perry, bachmann or palin are right. the problem is, none of those men are interested in getting into this race. i'm certain there will be a push for arubio now that representative ryan said no way, i'm not going to run. i have thought about it. contemplated it. jeb bushed ruled it out yesterday and mark arubio. they feel there's a real opening. when you look at the president at 38% in the gallup poll, it's extremely beatable. they feel they need an extremely
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electable republican to go against him. there's a lot of people connected to big donors sitting there one out until they find one that is the electable candidate. >> a young senator from florida seems natural. >> it doesn't matter a lot. what he would bring is a lot of interest in the hispanic community. that would be genuine. dan quail didn't hurt george h.w. bush. the vice president only makes a difference of 1% at most. why not? if i were the gop, go for it. >> he reaches into a community they need to do well in, the latino community and he's conservative. romney at the top of the ticket, you need to balance him up. watch it. i think rubio is going to have to answer questions. >> jim, with a look at the
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politico playbook. up next, one of the greatest coaches off all time. the leader of university of tennessee women's basketball program for four decades makes a stunning announcement. almost tastes like one of jack's cereals. fiber one. uh, forgot jack's cereal. [ jack ] what's for breakfast? um... try the number one! [ jack ] yeah, this is pretty good. [ male announcer ] half a day's worth of fiber. fiber one. discover aveeno positively radiant tinted moisturizers with scientifically proven soy complex and natural minerals. give you sheer coverage instantly, then go on to even skin tone in four weeks. aveeno tinted moisturizers.
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time for a little sports here. yankees at home. great game. oakland rookie, look at this shot. a home run into the upper deck in right field. it's only the second home run up in that section since the new stadium was built. does it again. another home run. this time up in the second deck. as jump out to a 6-0 lead. in the eighth inning, the yankees come sporming back. a three-run home run. the yankees bring it to within a run. a one-run game. two outs. bases loaded. swisher, again, another bomb into right center field. back against the wall.
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yankees lose a heart breaker, 6-5. that was all the talk on the newspapers. i don't have them in front of me, but it was great. new york post, hand me that harold, will you? swish miss on the back of the new york post. >> tied with the red sox. >> the yankees lost, red sox capitalized. adrian gonzalez making the case for a.l.mvp. in the fourth, he's going to do it again. 20 home runs, 97 rbis. the red sox win, 11-5. boston and new york tied. they meet for a three-game series next week. cardinals and dodgers. by the ninth inning, dodgers up 11-0. tony la russa lets his second
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baseman pitch. he gets off to a nice start. a strikeout. fans get with the good times. the next batter, a former teammate makes a play. that's his buddy, erin miles. cardinals lose, 13-2. milwaukee beat the pirates, 11-4. the brewers running away with the division, if you can believe it. they are up ten games on st. louis. yesterday, university of tennessee's head basketball coach, pat summitt made a stunning announcement in a prerecorded video. >> throughout my career i have always made it a point that my life and our basketball program were an open book. with that in mind, i have something to share with my tennessee family. earlier this year, the doctors at the mayo clinic diagnosed me with an early on set dementia,
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alzheimer's type at the age of 59. i plan to continue to be your coach. >> her photograph on the front page of the tennessen. to give perspective, this will be her 38th season coaching the lady's ball. in that time, she's racked up, 1,071 wins. more than any man or woman. she's won eight national titles. that's just two fewer than legendary ucla coach john wooden. harold you are a tennessee guy. >> you can't overstate what an icon she is in that state. >> all of sports, certainly tennessee. she will be embraced by the university more so. i read some of the tweets of her former players. congratulating her.
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it's always been transparent around her life and the university of tennessee basketball. >> alzheimer's runs in her family. her mother had this as well. she will lean harder on her assistant coaches. at points in the season, she felt things weren't clicking right. she went to get it checked out. >> she's handling it -- she's an icon for women in sports. title ix. you realize what she means. she's done it with such dignity all her life and her professional career has been extraordinary. i think this is another chapter in the way she is leading the way and teaching all of us how to handle disease. >> we will wish her the best. she will carry on through the season. she'll take it day-by-day and
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see how she feels. tom friedman comparing president obama to tiger woods and his golf game. we'll hear the argument next. ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪
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.. rpsegnp they felt the earthquake on martha's vineyard. it was so rough up there the president nearly missed a put. i feel bad for president obama's popularity sliding. he's on martha's vineyard. he's so bad, he may be the first president voted off the island. >> welcome back to "morning joe." we get into the must read op-eds.
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tom friedman writing one. i'll read part of it. it makes a comparison of the president and tiger woods. it's all nonsense talking about the criticism of president obama in comparison to jimmy carter. he's got the right instincts on where the country needs to go. opposition dedicated to making him fail. lately, he is off his game. he is not jimmy carter, he's tiger woods. a natural that lost his swing. he's got so many people whispering in his ear about what the polls say he's lost all his natural instincts into the game. it's crazy what's happening in america. an economic crisis and politicians having an election. the president needs to bring them together. it can only happen if he stops
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playing not to lose. we need a grand bargain. run on that, mr. president. pressure missing to shame republicans into joining you. we'll get a deal and run in 2012 on a platform. if you win, it will give you a mandate for the change the country needs. katty, what do you think? >> friedman's got a point. the president didn't go out, sell his grand bargain around the country. people don't know what he's talking about. he caved when it came to the debt deal with the republicans. i think there are too many people whispering this is a hazard for a president in a run up to an election year. there's an economic crisis. i'm not sure i agree with the golfing analogy but i think in the substance of it, this seems to be a president who seems to have lost a sense of direction and ability to take on the
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country at the moment. >> i don't want to be horribly unkind and at risk of anything that is in the new york times. look, he is who he is. the economy is struggling. he's at 38%. what do you expect? i don't think -- look, obama has his faults and problems. i don't think this is an insightful analysis comparing it to a golf player. obama's got problems and the economy sucks. has he done everything right? of course not. no president does. i like tom friedman, but every day you read in the papers, they have a better idea and most of them don't know what they are talking about. >> there's an economic crisis and politicians are running for office at the moment? >> i do agree with that. it's not obama's problem.
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he has a terrible economy. we have a crisis of confidence in this country. we expect the president to fix the confidence crisis. it never happens. once in awhile it does. >> there was a case to be made to the country that you cannot tackle the deficit issue without having revenue solution. i don't think the president made a convincing enough case. >> i think he's made the case and most people agree with him. >> two-thirds of americans say you have to tackle the deficit with revenue and spending cuts. why did he cave on the debt? >> that issue -- >> which is the basic premise. >> that's the people who criticized that from the beginning. he's a negotiator. he's not a my way or the highway. that's the way he is. it's not unusual to be at 38% in
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a terrible economy. ronald reagan's numbers were terrible when he ran for re-election. the armchair philosophers who carry on like this. i got plenty of criticism from the president with a health care bill. i thought it was a lost opportunity. i get tired of having been in one of those chairs, hearing this from columnists from various papers. the right has nothing to add. they are mean spirited. they are. >> everyone on the right is mean spirited. >> most of them are. >> wow. >> the fundmental challenges the economy is not performing, the president made declarations about what a stimulus package would do and the health care bill. it's not panned out. i agree, not all of it is his fault. friedman's failure is the tiger woods analogy. i hope he corrects this. i think it's substantive about
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what he says. it's time for the president to try different things. you have to allow businesses in the country to feel safe again. having run a state that anyone looking to employ people want to know what the rules are going to be, taxes are going to be. the cabinet secretary saying look at the regulations. it may be the business. eric cantor criticized him calling it underwheeming. it's nothing but politics. the white house needs to continue to find ways to give the businessmen, the job creators in this country, the confidence, and stability about hiring. >> i disagree with that, too. the business problem with the business community is the business community. look at how they are behaving. who is going to have confidence if they invent a financial
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instrument they know is going to fair. >> wall street is main street. if you beat up on the banks responsible for lending -- >> i don't think we should beat them up, make them behave. they are a danger to the american economy. >> fair enough but we passed dodd-frank. you have to give them some level of predictability. bank of america's stock will resemble how this country goes. if they stock goes up, america is being rehabilitated. remember, these two streets go hand-in-hand. big mistakes made on wall street. at the end of the day, without a viable, healthy, smart, financial system, it's hard for any system. >> that's not obama's fault. it's wall street's fault. they don't have it yet. >> andrea, go ahead. >> tom frooiedman is a golfer.
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don't be smooth, don't be cool, just take some risks. that's what he's really saying. get out there. if he had explained what was in the grand bargain, explain what he is about to deliver, he can recapture that and just forcefully tell people what he is for. >> governor dean, don't you think the american people don't want to hear it's out of his hands. he inherited this. >> of course they don't want to hear that. i'm not advocating he say that. the fact of the matter is 38% has to do with the economy and very little to do with his style. there are things i agree should be changed. he needs to go out and be positive and fight against the republicans. the truth is, fighting against the republicans won't work with him. the truth is, this is not an
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abnorral situation for a president during these times. >> you and i agree on that. >> right. >> we should lower that, if every dime creates jobs. right now, wall street will not disclose it. >> everybody wants to blame wall street. at the end of the day, accept some of the blame. this is not all wall street. we'll be right back. excuse me? my grandfather was born in this village. [ automated voice speaks foreign language ] [ male announcer ] in here, everyone speaks the same language. ♪ in here, forklifts drive themselves. no, he doesn't have it. yeah, we'll look on that. [ male announcer ] in here, friends leave you messages written in the air. that's it right there. [ male announcer ] it's the at&t network. and what's possible in here is almost impossible to say.
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oh, yes. is it time? >> it is, pre-recorded mika brzezinski. see you back here on monday along with joe scarborough. have you heard about the quake? 5.8, we sleep through those things. here is how it looked at 1:51 p.m. eastern time when it hit. these will scenes from across the country. >> what is it? it's an earthquake. >> this standard protected -- >> i have been through earthquakes in seattle.
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>> i think we have an earthquake, boys. we are having an earthquake. we just had a quaky earthquake. there's another tremor. 1:52. holy mackerel. that's my first. >> the whole thing, really, yeah. we are from england. i have never experienced anything like that. >> omaha, tranquil conditions. why is everything shaking. look at the lights. let me get away from under here. >> thought we would take this opportunity to show the new customer wing. what was that? >> the guy in virginia shooting a furniture commercial. his staff abandoning him as he
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tries to carry on. that's how it looked from your desk, live on the air yesterday. >> yeah. that's the metaphor. andrea, stay with us. we're going to have a live report from richard engel and jeremy will join us. keep it here on "morning joe." we'll be right back. ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ [ male announcer ] we've got all you need for back to school with low prices every day on everything. backed by our ad match guarantee. save money. live better. walmart. ♪ [ country ] backed by our ad match guarantee. [ man ] ♪ gone, like my last paycheck ♪ gone, gone away ♪ gone, like my landlord's smile ♪
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♪ a lot of people react differently to an earthquake.
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major bloomberg felt it and ran looking for cover. they found him during the earthquake standing under his desk. they traced the epicenter of the earthquake to chris christie's aerobic's class. tray traced the epicenter to kim kardashian's honeymoon suite. >> there you go. live picture there of new york city. yes, we are still here. i think we have a shot at washington. yep, washington is still there. there's a crack at the top of the washington monument. it's going to be closed indefinitely. harold ford jr. along with an dree that mitchell and tina brown, the former mayor of washington. i have a question for you, does washington, d.c. have a plan for
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something like this? an emergency plan? >> so there are plans set out in cities like d.c. for a general catastrophe. it's the transportation plan, how you evacuate, a communication plan, who you should listen to. what would have happened yesterday in d.c. is the mayor would have communicated with homeland security department and they would have made joupt announcements. the interesting thing is fema is exploring different ways to do a mass communication. with 22 states impacted, there's a test of fema coming up in november. you wonder if there would have been a mass alert. had it been worse, the telephone lines in d.c. were useless, within minutes. this is the same thing we saw right after september 11th in d.c. no one could make a call in or out. the governments have gotten better. i'm not sure how much technology
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improved. >> the cell phones were out. i was trying to call my wife, you couldn't get through. the phones were shut down. the systems were shut down. it's a good point. >> andrea, the traffic jams were outrage out. despite the fact we avoided a catastrophe, you can only imagine if there was more damage. >> the first fear is it's a 9/11 moment. there's an attack. then the traffic is because metro had to get back up on the subway at 15 miles per hour to check the tracks. that's understandable. you are going to have that gridlock. that can create other problems if this wasn't an earthquake but another event. the telephones were critical. >> andrea mentioned the 9/11 moment. i was on the third floor in our office and our skyscraper
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building gradually swayed. the first vision you have is a clear sky and 9/11. our thought now is toward terrorism. >> tina's office is on the lower west side. she's not far from ground zero. >> it's true, our first instincts have changed over the last ten years. let's turn to politics. former florida governor, jeb bush warning fellow republicans about going too far about the criticism to president obama. he was on fox talking about the economy and urged republicans to campaign on substance. >> i think the president means well, but his policies failed. just to stop there and say i'm going to win because i'm against what's going on is not enough.
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you have to win with purpose. you have to persuade and defend a position. you can't just be against the president. he's made a situation that was bad, worse. he is deserving of criticism for that. he's not deserving of the criticism of all, you know everything from the common cold all the way up the chain. when you ascribe bad motives to the guy, it's wrong. it turns off a lot of people that want solutions. it's early to be dissatisfied. they will stake out positions that are responsible and forward leaning and positive and hopeful and optimistic. as that happens, i think people will migrate toward those candidates. >> you're not running right now? >> what do you mean right now? i'm not running. >> the new gallup tracking poll shows president obama's approval rating at 38%.
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mayor, what about jeb bush's message there? campaigning on substance and not going on personal attack of the president? >> that's absolutely going to be critical for the republicans. i think they have gone too far, at least the early round of campaigning. you can't help but notice how sober and maybe he doesn't want it, but presidential bush's remarks sounded yesterday. it's refreshing having watched a couple weeks of the obama bashing. then to be fair, the republican bashing by the democrats. the beauty of the obama campaign in 2008 is it was not the red state, not the blue states, but the united states of america. i's what people want us to get back to. >> tina, do republicans want to get to that? they love the red meat. >> they love it and the
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inflammatory soundbytes. jeb bush would be that candidate. jeb bush can't run because it's too close to the bush era. in a way, he's the candidate to run. if he has to wait for years, who knows what could happen. the press couldn't bear to write about that story again. he's stuck. it is an irony. he probably would be the best person to run right now. >> i agree with everything. i don't fully agree it's not a year he couldn't put it together. he took on bachmann, perry and the rest of them. he elevated romney and huntsman because they are the only ones resembling his remarks, but none of them have his tone. if you are a republican, i would
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be interesting to hear what we should be doing. he said what the republicans are going and the bad motives. out would be interesting to hear his plan for policy. if you are president obama and you listened to jeb bush, you see an opening. the opening is clear. you have to focus like you said you were going to be for a year and a half. this speech after labor day is that much more important, not just the speech as benjamin franklin once said. well done is better than well said. the president's got to say it well and do it. if he focuses on the economy and gets things moving again, whether it's jeb bush or romney or huntsman. i don't always agree with howard dean but he's right. people agree with obama but he's got to get the economy moving. jeb bush said he's made the situation worse. he's got to make it better. if he doesn't make it better,
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huntsman, bush they are going to be formidable candidates next year. >> andrea, it raises the question, what the president can do over the next 12 months to change not just the approval number, but the unemployment number. he's got a big speech coming up after labor day. what can he do big? >> that's the challenge. there's not only the problem that even economists can't agree on what to be done short term. there are a lot of ideas for what can be done down the road. to get the numbers down in time for the re-election campaign, that's almost impossible even if you do stimulus and infrastructure and hiring. you are not going to make a dent in the unemployment or the long-term unemployment. that's a bigger case. it's going to affect the democratic base.
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>> what would you like to see? >> i'm baffled by his style of attack, i have to say. i saw him on the bus tour. why would you get on that bus, riding around the country without a jobs plan? it's like he's a captive to what was booked months back. it seemed like an utter waste of time. i would have liked to see him go off then, hibernate for a few days and come back to something clear. i am tired of hearing how it's going to pivot toward jobs. how much pivoting do you have to do? he doesn't seem to understand that message to be overpowering. i don't know if it's too late now. >> mr. mayor, shouldn't he put forth a big plan. get on the road and sell your plan? >> no. it's absolutely right. you know, there's a couple
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articles over the past week that suggest obama is listening too much to the washington insider. he's become exactly what he ran against. we have been in politics, we get advisers telling you things. the best thing about obama is his own personal instincts. they are to take from the right and the left. what i hope is that after labor day, the speech and plan will please republicans and democrats and upset republicans and upset democrats. i hope people criticize them in a way that makes them seem he's making the tough decisions. you are not going to get out of this without really tough decisions. that's what leadership is all about. i think leadership is upsetting people in your own party sometimes. >> he's going to have things republicans don't like, closing loopholes, big deficit cutting. does an idea that big have a
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chance of getting through congress? >> governor dean said how do you expect the american people to not blame the president? you can't say you inherited a bad situation. ultimately, the president has to decide. obama had a bad august, he's the worst august president in of time. '09 was terrible. '10 was the republicans winning the election. this year, people being critical of jobs. he's the best president in november and december. obama is mr. november and december. he put together the ability to pass the health care. don't ask don't tell, he extended it. he extended unemployment benefits. here we are again. a bad august. he's got to come back in november and early december and find a grand bargain or deal around everything from reducing
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spending but to stimulating this economy. not a stimulus plan, but tax cuts republicans can agree to and spending the democrats want to run an infrastructure bank or whatever. he's got to hammer that deal and find partners in the senate and house to do it. i think he waits for bus tours. there should have been a plan on the table and campaign for what republicans should be in support of. the president will say they already know. i have been talking about it. as you and i know, you have to continue to put these issues before the voters. republicans continue to do it. this president, when he gets back, i hope he goes back on the road with the jobs plan, with the growth plan for the country. it's the only way it's going to pass and track republicans. >> you are right, though, about the way he has a weird ability to rebound. it's the guy who didn't do work. >> he always said it first. >> i know. he does miss windows.
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you have to understand where your windows are. i feel he blew that post whacking of o osama bin laden moment. he just doesn't seize his windows of attention. he sits back in those moments. >> here is something the white house is putting out. see how you feel about this. a plan that would streamline regulations over government offices. 500 regulations and save $10 billion. changes will be made to the department of labor, department of transportation, e.p.a., hospitals and how stock market transactions are reported to the irs. he's trying to cut red tape to stimulate the economy. eric cantor rejected it calling
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it underwhelming and the president not doing everything in his power to help business owners. what about the critique from the right and people in the business that the president and his administration are not business friendly. >> it's the impression the business community has. i think cutting regulations is something the business community wants to hear. eric cantor may reject it out of hand. if there's something to be done to cut regulations and then the business community will have less claim against president obama and maybe take more seriously the obligation to start hiring and do something to spark the economy. >> you work on wall street. is this good news? >> it's good news for main street. businesses in the country, small, medium and big, they can
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plan for the future. eric cantor is playing politics. he's a friend, but he knows he's playing politics. this is a positive thing. i'm interested in seeing the fine print. anyone in business complaining about e.p. and the labor, overregular laying, this is a positive thing. if i were eric cantor, i would go through this and see what needs to be done, take it to virginia, your republican caucus go home tell big, small, medium business this is what they are doing. this is where obama ought to get out and make the case, republicans don't want to help. they want to stand in the way and defeat me and democrats. i'm trying to create jobs. this is the first step. >> he needs to continue this. we are within a year of the election, but clearly the business community wants to see
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less regulation. there's too much regulation. too many rules. too many things that restrict business. if he continues for a second term, we'll see a probusiness democrat. >> andrea, thanks for being here this morning. what do you have coming up? >> no earthquakes. we have a lot of people to talk about libya. we're talking politics and we'll follow up on jeb bush and what he is up to. >> we'll be watching at 1:00 as always. thank you very much. >> you bet. what is next in libya? where is gadhafi? we'll ask jeremy scahill, next. first, todd santos with a check at the forecast. >> willie, i want to give you a quick update on hurricane irene.
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a category 2 storm. 100 miles per hour sustained winds. it's making its way off to the west-northwest. we are going to track the system over the coming days. as far as the potential for the impact in the u.s., we'll seibert chances as you work into the weekend, saturday. time line wise, there's a look at the track going through wednesday, thursday, friday or the rest of today. the saturday, sunday time frame is potential land fall. we'll talk about that coming up. dangerous conditions on the way. more on your local forecast. for you, you are watching "morning joe," brewed by starbucks. [ male announcer ] this is the network. a network of possibilities.
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we approach the compound unsure if it had really fallen. this is one of the main gates of gadhafi's compound. the rebels are going inside.
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there's been a fight here. they are moving in heavy weapons. the rebels have taken gadhafi's city. the loyalists inside have ran away. today, gadhafi lost his compound and his country. >> richard engel reporting yesterday. he marched into gadhafi's compound. he's calling on supporters to call on tripoli saying the regime will either win or become martyrs. a man making the remarks after a local radio address. it comes after they went into the compound to find gadhafi and his family were not there. the complex was destroyed by nato air strikes. his departure was a tactical move. he's toured tripoli and does not believe the city is in any
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danger. in a separate interview, they said the regime can survive for months and possibly years. gadhafi loyalists will turn tripoli into, his words, a death trap for the opposition. one area where they maintain control is the hotel where 35 journalists are being held. they are not allowed to leave. the heavy gunfire can be heard around the hotel. joining us from tripoli, richard engel. walk us through what you saw yesterday. we saw some of it in your remarkable report. we played a bit of it. tell us what you saw as rebels stormed through the gates of the compound. >> reporter: we arrived 15 to 20 minutes after the main group of rebels fully secured the compound. the rebels had their big break sometime in the afternoon when
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they managed to make a gap in the wall, plunged through the 20-foot high walls arpd the compound. then intense fighting. we're not sure how many loyalists were in there. we didn't see many bodies. a few bodies. many of them may have escaped. from what we could see, dozens or a few hundred loyalists in the compound. it wasn't packed with thousands. we didn't see their meals or ammunition. they had a lot of weaponry. when we got there, we were entering with large groups of rebels. the fighting just stopped and looting just began. people coming in by the thousands taking weapons and cars. they broke into his private armory. there are boxes and boxes of new automatic rifles, a luxury car,
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some sort of volks wagon, i think. some of the rebels were carrying each other firing their guns in celebration. it was a very chaotic scene. then the celebrations at the green square where they are still firing their guns in excitement. >> richard engel is not flinching. >> reporter: i lost my voice. i'm ch i i'm screaming over the gunfire. i wish they would stop. they have fired more bullets in the air than on the compound. they were firing rpg, se celebratery rpg. that is wild. we are trying to cut through some of the baghdad propaganda
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we are hearing from the information minister, they say we have the city under control. stay and fight. what is the truth about how many loyalists remain in tripoli, if any, at this point? >> reporter: well, they have this one hotel as you mentioned earlier. that is a serious problem. there are 30 plus foreign journalists staying at the hotel. they were invited in by the government. the expectation was that they would be in the best position when the city fell to cover it. the expectation was when the city fell, the government officials staying at the hotel would run away. that's exactly what happened in iraq as baghdad was falling. the problem is, the people at the hotel, there may be senior people that decided it's better to keep the journalists around them to keep them safe. they are putting out wild
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statements like the city is under their control. it is clearly not under their control. this hotel and there may be a few pockets in the city particularly where gadhafi does have supporters. not an arm's quarter of the city or even a percentage. perhaps a few streets here or there. it's negligible. >> we in the west have a vested interest in what's happening at the hotel. what can they do to turn that around? is there anything nato can do? >> it's unclear how dangerous or how precarious it is inside. some reports of gunfire in the area right now. the question is, will these government loyalists decide it's better to let the journal itselves go, let them go and do their work or try to use them effectively as human shields and
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hostag hostages. how this escalates is unknown at this stage. is there anything nato could do? there's the option of -- you talk a commando operation. >> before i let you go, i heard you say yesterday they were calling it victory day in libya yesterday. they did take over the gadhafi compound. they did not find him inside. what is the next move as these rebels plan? what are they thinking today? >> you know, gadhafi made a statement, there was a radio statement that was broadcast on television from gadhafi. it's the first time we have heard from him. he suggested he may have been in the compound itself. he called leaving the compound a tactical decision. retreat would be another way. a lotsz would be another way. it was a tactical decision that the city he called on his
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reporters to come out and fight against the spies and collaborators. he called them ominously to cleanse the city of the rats. these are the people he considers rats, the rebels who are now in control. whether this is just a statement, or what, we haven't seen evidence into it. what's next? celebrations are continuing. then they are going to have to, at some stage, stop firing guns in the air and figure out how to rule the country. lost you -- >> richard engel live in tripoli. thanks so much, richard. a new law enforcement group is emerging in the u.s. intelligence community. the associates press. that and more when "morning joe" returns. ♪ [ country ]
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♪ welcome back to "morning joe." 7:33 here in the morning on the east coast. taking new steps toward forming a national council. the mistrust are preventing them from a unified front.
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comes as the united states top envoy defied the syrian government and making an unannounced visit. they put restriction on the travel after his surprise visit last month to show support for pro-democracy demonstrators. a resolution to the united nations security council for an armed embargo on syria. the draft, which is backed by the united states, condemns the ongoing violence saying the government has committed crimes against humanity. it's not clear when they will come to a vote. one year after a compensation plan in the gulf of mexico oil spill, the process has largely succeeded. feinberg says he's optimistic
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about the program. payments will be made this year. he's come under fire from gulf coast lawmakers and others saying he's not moved quickly enough to compensate victims of the spill. bp argues that the claims are overly generous. a spokesperson says amy whinehouse had no illegal drugs in her system when she died. alcohol was present in her body. the cause of her death remains unclear. the results are surprising. whinehouse died last month at the age of 27. well the start of the football season is two weeks away. tomorrow, the nfl network's michael lombardi gives us what to look for. harry will be here to discuss his role in a documentry.
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standing by in the green room, jeremy scahill is next. you're watching "morning joe" brewed by starbucks. you name it. i've tried it. but nothing's helped me beat my back pain. then i tried this. it's salonpas. this is the relief i've been looking for. salonpas has 2 powerful pain fighting ingredients that work for up to 12 hours.
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unfortunately, on libya, the policy was too late. i'm very happy moammar gadhafi is not going to be in libya. i think the administration waited too long to move one way or another. they had to move early. not doing that allowed it to go on longer. >> welcome back to "morning joe." that was mark arubio speaking on fox news.
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joining us now, national security reporter jeremy scahill. some people say the president didn't go about it the right way but it's the outcome we wanted, gadhafi is out of power. >> the situation in libya is different from other revolts we have seen. this was really nato enforced regime change, if you want to be honest about it. pummeling libya with missiles for months and going off to the races with a fairly focused regulation. we know little about the rebel we are reporting and the mixture of the wealthy formal regime. true to form, they come out and talk about how they are going to open it up for western oil. a lot of people were pushed aside when talking the oil interest in libya. the antiwar people that never reconcile it with what the
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president does. if you look at "the new york times," it's a huge piece that the people back in libya are going to push the oil contracts from china and brazil who are taking opposition to what the u.s. was doing. the criticism of the president, though, that he didn't act fast enough, i would go at it from a different angel. i think that those people who are criticizing him and saying he didn't do enough haven't been studying covert u.s. policy. this president is widely using the cia, there was a massive air strike in yemen where upwards of 30 people were killed. we have six or seven wars going at the same time. that criticism is ill founded. if anything, we should be questioning if this is the policy the u.s. wants to move forward with. i don't care that moammar
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gadhafi is gone. the issue for me, as an american is how does it comport with our vags of international law and order when we can force regime change. it's a slippery slope. bush would have had more pushback. >> you said yesterday, this is the first example we have seen of obama's foreign policy style, take a backseat, work with allies and not work unilaterally as we had with george bush. >> i agree with what jeremy said. it's a good analysis of what he's doing. you don't commit trillions of dollars to the war in iraq. it works better over the long term because you don't get a lot of public resistance, drones, special operations forces, use of intelligence agencies. it's what he did in libya. this was a nato effort. it wasn't like operation whatever it was called.
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>> coalition of the willing. >> operation mermaid dog. >> who comes up with this? >> frankly, it would have been smarter if you wanted to get rid of saddam hussein and making iran a winner. we have made iran a major power. it would have been smarter to spend money on drones and take out saddam that way. >> we had a lot of soft power and hard power, not smart power. obama has been criticized for leading from behind. this is a place where i like his caution. he's proving to be a very interesting kind of war president, actually. he's very careful and considered unthreatened by the noise around him. he goes in in a smart way and gets the result without having a bunch of american loss of life.
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>> not to rain on your drone-loving parade here, but the president has dramatically expanded the drone operations. i was in somalia as well as yemen. one of the aspects is we have to be individual lent in monitoring blow back. in pakistan, it's a major propaganda tool. taliban and other insurgent groups, a lot of civilians have been killed. in somalia, you know, we are killing tremendous numbers of innocent people in the per suur of a handful. as this president expands the hard hammer of culvert operations, it's reach around the world. i think we have to be concerned
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we are making future enemies. this stuff comes back. >> the problem is you have to understand, you do understand because this is your life, but the main mission here is to stop them before they get to the united states. that's the underlying mission. if they run somalia, presumably al qaeda will be invited and that is their base. it's going to be what the least bad thing to do. what obama is doing is better than what george bush did. >> i think obama has been able to expand programs that president mccain would not have been able to. it's why he's got a lot of popularity. they have been let off the leash. former operative told me, we are able to hit harder in more countries under obama than we were under bush and they have the full protection of a sharp president who's created a legal
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framework saying we can do this. >> it's better than spending massive troops and 5,000 or 6, 000 american lives. in iraq and afghanistan both, the end of the troop presence is not around the corner. we have been hearing rumblings about 20 or 30 more years in afghanistan. in iraq, there's an agreement that extends the presence of u.s. troops there. i agree with you, the president's rhetoric about ending the operations is a step forward. i don't think we are seeing it in action. >> you are right about the whole scary aspect. it's only going to be down the line. there is something about the libyan rebel yan. it's unbelievable to watch this. do we have confidence at all in any member of this opposition that anybody is going to be able
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to do anything. talk about breaking it and fixing it. >> there's good reporting on this right now. all of us, i think, are in awe of the courage and bravery of journalis journalists. just incredible reporting has come out of this. at the end of the day, who are the people running libya? it's a coalition of people that are very untested on the international scene and i think that the possibility of libya continuing to be incredibly unstable for a long time to come is certainly there. who are these guys? are they islamics? >> isn't that what we always do? whether it's iraq or afghanistan, we get the bad guy out and worry about what happens later. >> the last time we did a regime change we get what? you have u.s. soldiers being
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killed. we're going to get paid with oil. we're not good at regime change. >> the american people and the media are naive. the best we are going to do out of the arab spring is a democracy in tunisia. the other countries are not going to be democracies. they may be more than they used to be. anybody who thought egypt was going to be a democracy, the best we can hope is it's controlled by the military as long as you don't go past a certain line, it's more democratic than it was. the biggest problem in egypt is the economy. they can't create the number of jobs that need to be created. who knows what's going to happen in libya. it's not a democracy. >> if we move into libya and plan oil, which it seems like it's going to happen, i think
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it's going to backfire. it's going to become fly paper for jihad. i think the u.s. is shortsighted in the libya policy. >> jeremy scahill, one of the best reporters out there. >> thank you for having me. >> tina brown, what do you have now? >> there's a good piece about how this brings gadhafi to the war crimes. he may not be tried just in libya. he's controlled the whole system. he must be taken out, otherwise, a lynching that could never be good. >> read it at the dailybeast.com. one "snl" comic is posing, oh my goodness as some of the all time great players. we'll show you the pictures when we come back.
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catch up on some sports from last night. where else do you start but the new york yankees. taking on the oakland a's last night, watch the home run by brandon allen. this is a bomb up into the upper deck at yankee stadium. that's only the second time that's ever happened. of course, the stadium is only three years old. and in the eighth allen does it
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again this time only making the second deck. a's are up 6-0 in the eighth inning, but in the bottom the yankees come back, nick swisher hits a three-run home run there to make it 6-3 and yankees pulled within one run in the bottom of the ninth and swisher comes up again with the bases load. a chance to be a hero. base hit wins the game. he wants the whole thing. going for a grand slam, hits one to right center, crisp the center fielder going back, has just enough room on the track. the game ends right there. yankee lose 6-5 with the yanks losing the red sox had a chance to pull into a tie in the a.l. east. taking on the rangersadian gonzalez making his case to be the mvp. where are the fans, by the way? got a red sox/rangers game. come on, two-run home run for gonzalez and the solo home run, did it again 20 home runs this year, 97 rbis for gonzalez, red sox win 11-5, and boston and new york tied for first place in the
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a.l. east, the two teams meet for a three-game series next week. the u.s. open tennis tournament starts this monday, "new york times" magazine previews its u.s. open cover story online today with a piece on intense tennis rivalries, it has an accompanying photo shoot of andy sandburg impersonating iconic champions, as agassi, as bourg, as john mcenroe, that's a good one, and jimmie conner. pretty good all the way around. the favorite is it pete sampras? >> bourg, he was my generation. year after year he won. he dominated. >> he was a freight player. >> he was a great player. >> all those players. andy sandburg. >> i think you like him. >> he's good that sandburg. coming up next more with howard dean, catty kay, and harold ford jr. and andrea
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♪ i feel the earth under my feet ♪ a magnitude 5.8 earthquake
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as this one was, these happen on a fairly regular basis out in california. the earth's crust there is very broken up, so the shaking will be felt in a small area. here, the earth's crust, you know, we're not at the edge of a tectonic plate where the plates are crashing against each other. we have very old rocks. they're very cold. they basically ring like a bell, so the energy from this earthquake gets transmitted very efficiently over a very broad area. you know, by now here in new york city, all throughout the east, they had an earthquake, like, a 5.8 earthquake happened about an hour ago. did you folks feel the earthquake? when i felt it, i was up in my office getting a facial and i felt it and i -- i jumped out of the chair and i screamed, oh, my god, it's the fatah. good morning, it's 8:00 here on the east coast as you take a live look at new york city, back
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with us on set, harold ford junior, katty kay and howard dean, and down in washington, andrea mitchell. andrea, tell us what happened? >> everything started moving. and i -- it sounded like a freight train. you've heard people say that. but the desk in the studio was going up and down and we were jumping up and down. and i dumbly didn't figure out what it was until the technical manager came in and said it's an earthquake, everyone get out of here. i said, can't i finish my show? >> that's andrea for you. >> you know, because as you all know, there are a lot of lights. there's a lot of stuff overhead that could come crashing down and so we're on the third floor of a three-story building and we all went down the steps and started dialing in as we were going down the stairs, dialling the control room to try to pick it up on -- on the -- on the cell phone. and get back on the air. >> i actually was watching your show at the time, andrea, and i saw you go off, and i could have sworn as you went to break, the camera shook a little bit and i thought your camera man had been
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drinking again. >> we have that problem. >> and 30 seconds later tamron busted in and said i think we had an earthquake. but let's turn to the dissenting view to katty kay. how big wimps are we for making such a big deal about this on the east cost? >> not wimps at all, i'm sure, it's a very, very terrifying experience for you, willie, here in new york. >> the wall shook in my apartment, it didn't faze me much. >> i'm a bit of an earthquake snob, i lived in japan for three years, and as we know, they have serious earthquakes in japan. i was in a manhattan hotel room on the ninth floor, and i felt a trembling and it felt kind of nice, like a massage machine on the bed. >> i knew you were going to diminish this for us in some way. >> harold, did you feel it? >> i was in westchester, so i didn't feel it. my wife felt it, but i didn't. >> governor dean? >> i did.
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i was on the ninth floor of the building and the blinds in the windows went back and forth, and i was on the phone, and i said holy blank, we're on the air, i'd actually been in an earthquake in vermont and in l.a. which was a little more swaying back and forth. a little creaking of the building. >> well, we confess to being wimps, we're just not used to it. >> in new york it was minimal and no damage. but they said there was damage, in virginia there was some damage. >> but schools are back in d.c. and i did ring up my 5-year-old who just started first grade and she said, oh, mom, it was so cool, we got recess. the upside. >> the schools closed. >> they just closed the schools. but the only other searirious pt is north anna, recently a study said that's the seventh least safe or that is protected against earthquakes and that
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it's protected for a 5.9 to a 6.1. north anna did trip which is what it's supposed to do and shut down automatically. went on diesel backup fuel to keep those -- those fuel rods cool enough and safe. so, everything's safe there. it was right at the epicenter. but there is still that question because east coast reactors are not as well protected and defended against an earthquake as, of course, west coast reactors and we have an aging nuclear system here. >> defiant moammar gadhafi calling on his supporters still to come to tripoli and fight back against the opposition. saying his regime will either, quote, win or become martyrs. a man claiming to be gadhafi made the remarks during a local radio station broadcast later on television as well. this comes after rebels stormed past the gate of the libyan leader's fortified compound only to find that gadhafi nor his family were inside. the purported gadhafi claimed the complex had already been
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destroyed by nato air strikes adding that his departure from the facility was a tactical move. the speaker gave no clues about calf daffy's location but did say he's toured tripoli and does not believe the city is in danger. in a separate interview, the defense minister said the regime can survive for months if not years and gadhafi loyalists will turn tripoli, in his words, a death trap for the opposition. nbc's chief foreign correspondent richard engel made his way inside the compound where he found the rebels with amazing reporting. here's richard. >> reporter: we approached the compound unsure if it had really fallen. this is one of the main gates of gadhafi's compound. the rebels are going inside. there are bullet holes. there's clearly been a fight here. they're even moving in their heavy weapons. the rebels had taken gadhafi's forbidden city. the loyalists inside apparently ran away. today gadhafi lost his compound and also his country.
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but where was gadhafi? rebels scoured the grounds. and think they spot gadhafi loyalists. they fire. but the loyalists are gone. and gadhafi remains at large. the leader of libya for 42 years is now a fugitive, wanted by international forces, and no longer considered in command by his people. >> richard engel reporting there. one area where the gadhafi regime maintains control, the five-star riksos hotel where some international journalists are being held by forces loyal to gadhafi and not allowed to leave. reuters is reporting that heavy gunfire can be heard in the area around the hotel. katty kay, that's certainly a scary situation for international journalists, they were brought in by gadhafi to cover what was happening and not allowed to leave the hotel to cover what was happening. >> it shows gadhafi forces are still trying to hold on to some forms of communications and, who knows, use these journalists as pawns in their last holdout
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while they're in tripoli. the bbc's matthew price is in there and there's an nbc producer in there as well. journalists will want to be out there covering the story, so whatever else they are going through, you know they've got to be frustrated about not being out there. the last couple of days suggested to me how much there's a fog of war there's a good piece in the "new york times" about that this morning about how we had information and disinformation and gadhafi has perpetrated it throughout the course of his regime, and the rebels have done it as well, saying they've taken places they haven't, and saying they've arrested saif, the son of gadhafi and he's wandering around the hotel and not being arrested. we have to be careful what we see on twitter feeds, how reliable it is and where the rebels are in control and not in control and it will be tricky over the next few weeks, too, as we try to find out what the rebels do with the gadhafi loyalist and i think that will be a key to the transition
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process and to the future of libya and the west's relationship with the rebels how they handle the next few days, how they handle the next few weeks will give us a big indication about what kind of libya we're looking at. >> we have our version of baghdad bob, the information minister saying that tripoli will be turned into a death trap for the opposition even as moammar gadhafi is nowhere to be found. what's the next chapter? it seems like every day we have something new. what happens next, andrea? >> well, finding the fugitive gadhafi. finding him because he remains a symbol for the final resisters. that's a big challenge and, of course, asserting civilian control. the rebel group, the rebel leaders, are trying to head to tripoli to put their stamp on the capital city. that will be an important symbolic moment. the u.n. and the u.s. treasury trying to disentangle those sanctions. as we found briefly in 2006 with north korea when there was a brief moment of rapprochement, i was there, with bill richardson
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then, the envoy, they were trying to lift some of the sanctions to spur a possible re-engagement, and it's very difficult. once they're in place legally, it's very, very difficult to take all the steps to get the banks to agree to let money be released because they don't want to have any exposure legally down the road. and they found that the $30 billion in assets but only about 10% of those are liquid assets. and then you reduce it down to what they can actually get their hands on. they're trying to get about $1 billion, $1.5 billion to this rebel group so they can get started. >> and the hunt goes on for gadhafi, we'll see where that takes us today. domestic politics here, the 2012 presidential race, former governor jeb bush a guy a lot of people in the republican party wish would run himself are warning republicans against going too far with their criticism of president obama. here's governor bush yesterday on fox news -- >> i think the president means well but his policies have failed and to point that out, nothing wrong with that, that's
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politics, but just to stop there and say i'm going to win because i'm against what's going on is not enough. you have to win with purpose if you really want to make these big changes. you have to persuade, you have to defend a position. you can't just be against the president. he's made a situation that was bad worse. and he is deserving of criticism for that. he's not deserving of the criticism of all, you know, everything the common cold all the way, you know, up the chain. i think when you start ascribing bad modus to the guy, i think that's wrong. it turns off a bunch of people that want solutions. i think it's a little early to be dissatisfied with the candidates. i think you'll find that the candidates will start staking out positions that are responsible and forward leaning and positive and hopeful and optimistic. and as that happens, i think people will start migrating towards those candidates. >> you're definitely not running right now. >> what do you mean right now? what does that mean? is that a trick question? >> ever? >> i'm not running.
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>> governor dean, if his last name were not bush as we look at the president's gallup daily tracking number, 30% approval rating, if this last name were not bush, would he be running for president right now? >> i have no idea whether he would be, but he certainly would be a good candidate. he's very conservative, so he has conservative bona fides, but he doesn't have the firry, in-your-face stuff that's over the top that i think turns off independents. so, i think as you say, if his last name were not bush, he'd be a strong candidate. >> harold, what about the message there from jeb bush? >> i think more important than his message, and i think the governor would likely agree, was his tone. >> yeah. >> he shared what a lot of republicans and i would argue some independents right now feel unfortunately about president obama and i think the president will turn this around. but i think there is some disappointment. i would even argue there are probably progressives and liberals who are slightly disappointed. but his tone was so positive, it helps him. i don't think he's out of this
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race, i think there's an opening for him or christie or someone because i think there's large dissatisfaction, broad dissatisfaction with the republican field. the only thing president obama has to worry right now, though, is the economy and jobs and get that trajectory moving in the right direction again and his re-election will take care of itself. the republicans are dissatisfied largely because of what jeb bush said there. their candidates are too negative. they blame president obama for anything and everything from spilling coffee in the morning to their kids being sick. i don't mean to joke about it, but they blame him for everything. it's funny, most republicans will not give the president credit for what's happening in libya. one of the great thing about the pictures we've seen is these are libya rebels leading it over and over again. although there is uncertainty about what the next iteration of leadership in libya will look like and i think all of the points are accurate to have the u.s. in the background and to have libyan rebels leading this effort is a positive thing for president obama and this country and i would argue for the face and kind of politics in the
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middle east for many years to come. >> katty, how about his message can to ascribe bad motives to president obama is not a helpful thing. >> particularly rick perry given the bad blood between the bush family and rick perry. he's an interesting candidate. i went down to spend a day with him in june with jeb bush, and i asked him that, if your name was anything other than bush, would be running? he said he was proud of the family name and proud of what his pro had done. i said, you haven't ruled out running in 2016, but he said he hadn't ruled out being on "american idol." and you got rid of domestic monarchy a couple hundred years ago and wouldn't it be weird to have three bushes. and he said that's a legitimate concern. having three bush presidents would be an odd thing in this country, it would suggest the gene pool is very tight.
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but he's thoughtful on a whole range of issues from education to immigration. i wonder if some of his policies, for example, on immigration where he's got a strong vote with hispanics. he's done a lot for hispanic students in florida and you wonder if he's too moderate. i mean, two sort of unred meatish for the republicans. >> in the interview he said there's no bush/perry problem, it might be a karl rove thing, but the bushes have no problem with perry. that's what he said. and pulling back the curtain on one of america's leading covert intelligence agencies and it's not the cia. the associated press investigative reporter joins us to explain. the stock market rebounds with a climb of more than 300 points on the dow. what will the day hold in store? "business before the bell" is just ahead. but first, todd santos with a look at the forecast and hurricane irene. >> hey, willie, the latest from the national hurricane center we're now talking about a major hurricane, the first major hurricane of the year, and in
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this case we're talking about it impacting portions of the bahamas. it will spend a couple of days there and an unwelcome guest, and it trucks off to the west-northwest at 9 miles per hour, current sustained winds in that system 115 miles per hour. there's a look at what we're expecting the next couple of days the gradual swirl toward the north and eventually towards at least the portions of the outer banks of north carolina and saturday/sunday and there's still a little bit of time to prepare for the system, but make sure you are prepared for a potential impact of a category 3 hurricane, it may drop off a little bit as it gets toward the mid-atlantic coastline and getting into cooler waters and we'll see effects for the mid-atlantic coast and southeastern massachusetts and heavy rainfall, not be surprised to see some areas picking up 10 inches of rain in 24 hours. surfs are starting to pick up in the bahamas, but if you are planning something off the southeast coastline, the waves and the rip currents could be a big threat. the northeast corridor quiet from boston to d.c. and you see
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the showers from pittsburgh and eastern ohio and buffalo as well getting in on some of those and by tomorrow we'll get some of them here in the mid-atlantic and the southeastern new england. we'll be back with much more, you're watching "morning joe" brewed by starbucks. coffee doesn't have vitamins... unless you want it to. new splenda® essentials™ no calorie sweetener with b vitamins, the first and only one to help support a healthy metabolism. three smart new ways to sweeten. same great taste. new splenda® essentials™. ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ [ male announcer ] we've got all you need for back to school with low prices every day on everything.
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♪ welcome back to "morning joe." it's 8:19 on a wednesday morning. the bbc's katty kay, former governor howard dean, former d.c. mayor adrian fenty all back with us at the table. in the ten years since the 9/11 terrorist attacks the new york
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city police department has turned into one of the nation's most aggressive and sophisticated domestic intelligence agencies. the associated press is out just this morning with a monthlong investigation into the nypd's intel division, exploring its methods and the controversies surrounding it, joining is matt acuso, thanks for being with us. >> thanks for having me. >> nypd changed the way it did business after the attacks on september 11th. what did you find? >> it not only changed the way it did business, it created a very deep connection with the cia. they started to -- the nypd started to build these intelligence programs that really infiltrated muslim communities in ways that if the federal government did it would totally go against rules that have been set up to protect civil liberties and they did it with this unusual partnership with the cia. a very senior cia officer was dispatched by cia director
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george tenet to be his personal representative to the nypd and really helped create these intelligence-gathering programs, directed the intelligence gathering, supervised the intelligence gathering and that's relationship that continues today. recently the cia sent one of its most senior undercover officers to work out of one police plaza in new york as a covert officer. >> so, we're talking about former cia agents now working within the new york police department, traveling -- >> they're current cia officers. >> on the cia payroll, working with the new york police department, traveling abroad and using intelligence to work in conjunction with the nypd. we should point out the new york police department has put out a statement saying the new york police department is doing everything it can to assure that there's not another 9/11 here and more innocent new yorkers are killed by terrorists. we have nothing to apologize for in that regard. that from nypd spokesman paul
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broune. what's the biggest complaint with this program that you found in your investigation? >> one of the things that is little known that they do, they have this program called the demographics program. it was described to us by officers involved as they were mapping the human terrain of the city. they were putting undercover officers, ethnic officers, inside middle eastern neighborhoods of stocity and th job is to hang out and blend in and look for things that are suspicion. and that could be something as simple as who is looking at radical books in a bookstore and who is looking at al jazeera and applaud about a report about an ied in iraq and that could be enough to get you in a report at the nypd, they also have informants that they call mosque crawlers who as the name suggest just go to the mosques and are eyes and ears for the nypd inside mosques. the fbi puts informants in mosques but there's a bar that says there has to be specific information related to criminal
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activity and that bar isn't there at the nypd, the nypd said it just follows leads, but we've talked to a number of people involved in the mosque crawler program who say we just have them there as our eyes and ears. >> how does the nypd get away with that, then, if they don't have the legal right to do it as you suggest, how are they getting away with it? >> so, there's the federal laws that the federal government has to apply and then, you know, obviously nypd is subject to city and state laws. but what's really interesting here while, you know, the real question of the past decade at the federal level has been do we have to give up civil liberties in the name of security and that debate has kind of focused on the fbi and the cia, warrantless wiretapping that sort of thing. there hasn't been that kind of debate in new york. there isn't the level of oversight on the nypd's intelligence division that there is in washington on, say, the cia or fbi. you know, the -- the tactics that they use don't get the kind of scrutiny by the city council, and the federal government has given the nypd about $1.6
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billion since 9/11, but there's very little federal oversight when it comes to what exactly the nypd is doing as far as intelligence gathering. >> katty kay? >> during your reporting, did you come across any officers within the nypd who had qualms about the legality of this? ever since 9/11 there has been a trend here for people to be prepared to give up civil liberties in the name of security, but i was just wondering whether you met people, you know, who knew about the program, within the police force who said we're not quite sure if this is really what we're meant to be doing? >> there were. it was interesting, there were people who said they felt uncomfortable, but those people didn't tend to be in the -- in the inner circle, the people who were directly involved in these programs. i mean, there's a close hold sort of a shudder of secrecy around a lot of what happens. the people who were directly involved, and we talked to a number of them, said almost to a person, look, we need to -- we need to be doing this. i mean, we have to be out in the muslim community because that's
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where the -- that's the community that is, you know, that's sending terrorists to attack us. and they compared it to, like, well, we would map drug dealing. we would map murders. the difference is in this instance you're not mapping crimes, you're mapping people. and that's -- that's the difference here. is they're saying it's no different than we would go to where the robberies are, we'd put undercovers there, here they're just saying we're going where the muslims are. >> are there any court cases pending on this issue? you would think somebody would complain that this is a violation of at least the fourth amendment and who knows what else. >> it's interesting because there is a lawsuit, a federal lawsuit, related to the nypd intelligence division intilltration of anti-war groups ahead of the republican national convention in new york. but what's unique about this, in order to bring a lawsuit about this, you have to kind of know about it. you have to know that you were -- you were surveilled. and if you don't know, then it's kind of hard to bring standing.
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i mean, in a lot of ways as we were doing this reporting, i kept going back to the nsa wiretapping program and the people who said, well, i'm going to sue about this, and the government says, you can't sue because you don't know if you were wiretapped, and we can't tell you if you were wiretapped because that would, you know, jeopardize national security. >> are these people being wiretapped? is that one of the things they're doing routinely? >> we don't have any information about any sort of wiretapping, you know, blanket wiretapping programs. but we know the nypd did push years ago to try to get fisa authority which was, you know, seen at the justice department as a real -- a real grab to try to have the ability to do wiretapping. you know, that was unsuccessful, but we didn't uncover any information about that. >> adrian fenty, as mayor of washington, d.c., another city that, of course, was attacked on september 11th, anything similar to this within the washington police department? >> you know, we have a much smaller police department. 50,000 here in new york, 4,000 down in d.c.
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but d.c. absolutely has the counterintelligence units, but there's also the federal government in d.c., so the fbi and homeland security is in d.c. and in the d.c. region is doing probably a lot of the new york that this new york police department unit does up here. from what i understand about it, it's essential, because the only way that you're going to know about communication around the new york region and what's happening overseas is to be in and around it, and the federal government doesn't have the resources. so, you got to give bloomberg and his team a lot of credit for setting this up, for being so aggressive. from what i understand, the federal government really relies on the nypd to bring back intelligence. one thing was interesting was how many threats come against new york and washington, d.c. my police chief down in d.c. was briefed daily on threats, and they had to follow them and track them to make sure that they didn't escalate into something. >> and, matt, how much of this is done because the people of
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new york city say do what you have to do to prevent another terrorist attack? i mean, you said sanchez, larry sanchez, went in front of the federal government, he was up on capitol hill and said we've been given the public tolerance and the luxury to be very aggressive on this topic. they're going to keep going until they're told otherwise, aren't they? >> absolutely. and i think -- i think everybody acknowledges new york is different. and what, you know, mayor fenty said is absolutely right, i mean, nobody else has the -- nobody else has the resources. no other police department has the resources to do what the nypd is doing. i mean, i think the question is if this is a model for policing and counterterrorism, well, new york isn't the only -- isn't the only threat in the country. why aren't other police departments doing this? and what we've seen is there are instances where police departments have said, no, we don't want to do that. i mean, you know, in new york one of the things they did -- first things they did was said, you know, run me a report of all the pakistani cabdrivers so they
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could look for people who maybe got their taxi shields fraudulently so that they can maybe turn them into -- use that as leverage to turn them into an inform amendment. in cambridge, massachusetts, the police chief told us, yeah, we got a very similar request from boston pd for a list of all our somali cabdrivers and we said, no way, we don't do that, unless you have a specific criminal investigation or a cause. and in los angeles, you know, bill bratton, the police commissioner out there, i mean, just got skewered in 2007 for saying i would like to map my muslim community just so i know where this is. and civil rights groups just, you know, just hit the roof. so, i think, look, i think new york is unique. i think they do have a unique background given the -- given 9/11. they certainly have a deep relationship with the cia. the cia trained a police detective at the farm, you know, which is -- i mean, that's an unprecedented thing.
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so, it's -- they have that. they have 9/11. they have a lot of money. they have a low crime rate. these sorts of things are uniquely new york. >> matt, were there any instances you were given where the demographics unit, where the intelligence that are gathered have actually prevented some sort of terrorist attack? a specific example of where it had worked? >> well, we know that the intelligence division has had successes. you know, the herald square plt ahead of the republican convention is a perfect example. it didn't show the depth of the program, but, i mean, they used an undercover officer living in brooklyn and hanging out and they used an informant who before he was involved in this investigation had been basically a mosque crawler. so, they prevented a -- they prevented a terrorist attack on the subway. they got convictions. i mean, there was also an instance where they were able to -- the intelligence division
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undercover operating in new jersey was key to -- to arresting two people who were on their way to somalia to train for -- for terrorism. so, i mean, no question the intelligence division has had successes and has disrupted -- disrupted plots. i mean, what we were trying to do is say, look, let's have the discussion. let's -- let's be able to have the discussion about what the -- if there are trade-offs for that security, what are they. because i think that discussion has happened in washington, d.c., on federal programs, but it hasn't happened in new york. >> you know, a lot of this is going to be -- depend on the success or failure of this and the backlash if there is some, is going to depend on how the people in power use the authority. the reason the constitutional prohibited -- prohibitions exist and this is on the margins of that is so the government doesn't abuse its power in dealing -- in using this for political reasons, and if they never do that, then this is probably going to fly, i guess. and if they start using it for
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political reasons, then there will be a problem. but i think this is going to be -- this program is going to be widely supported by the american people and certainly even by many muslim-americans. as long as the government doesn't use it to oppress muslims as a group, most muslim americans don't want muslim terrorists either in the united states. >> but, i mean, doesn't that raise the question if that's the case, why don't we give the fbi this authority? why do we specifically say the fbi can't do this? i mean, the fbi certainly has its own checkered history with surveillance programs. >> exactly, they have their own checkered history. >> so does the nypd, in the '60s and '70s they were using the precursor of the intelligence division to spy a anti-war groups. it's a discussion that's been had at the federal level, it's not a discussion that's been had at the local level. and this -- the -- making the -- you know, making the wall more porous between what the cia can do overseas and domestically is a big aspect here, because if it is something we want from the
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cia, then why is it just happening in new york? i mean, why don't we put -- why doesn't the cia direct the intelligence gathering of every police department? >> i think it's a really important debate because we have a checkered past of using this information for political reasons as j. edgar hoover did and nixon did as president and others. >> matt apuzzo, thank you so much. it's a well-researched piece. people can read it at the associated press and draw their own conclusions. thanks a lot. >> thanks a lot for having me. up next, "business before the bell" with simon hobbs. "morning joe" will be right back. announcer ] anan anthis...is the netwo. a living, breathing intelligence that's helping drive the future of business. in here, inventory can be taught to learn. ♪ machines have a voice. ♪ medical history follows you. it's the at&t network -- a network of possibilities... committed to delivering the most advanced mobile broadband experience
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♪ the white house announcing a new plan that would streamline regulations across hundreds of government departments over the next five years. the 800-page report will revise 500 regulations and will reportedly save at least $10 billion. according to the plan changes will be made to the department of labor, transportation, the epa, health care providers and hospitals and in the way stock market transactions are reported to the irs. the president is trying to make good, he says, on his promise to cut the red tape in washington as a way to stimulate the economy. but house majority leader eric cantor quickly rejected the plan calling it underwhelming and accusing the president of not doing everything in his power to help business owners. u.s. markets meanwhile are
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back in rally mode ahead of a speech this friday by fed chairman ben bernanke. the dow was up 322 points yesterday. that's the biggest gain in two weeks for the blue chips. s&p and nasdaq also posting strong moves upward. "the wall street journal" noting the markets bet on a miracle as investors shrugged off another disappointing round in data in hopes that bernanke and the central bank will take additional steps to shore up the economy. let's get a check of "business before the bell" with cnbc simon hobbs live at the new york stock exchange. what do they think they'll hear from big ben? >> good morning to you, willie, i'm not sure to be honest with you. this is a very interesting period right now, the 14-hour period when we count down. this is basically the anniversary, of course, of when ben bernanke first unveiled qe-2 which was the speeding of $600 billion of cash into the economy with bond buying. they have hoped that one year on he would signal that we might enter qe-3 and we can discuss
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what it might look like, probably not like qe-2, but at the same time you have a number of the fed watchers from, for example, "the washington post" or indeed from "the journal" that you mentioned, people that basically, let's face it, are pry sprattly briefed by fed officials as to what the market should expect, playing down the prospect that he'll actually deliver anything that's particularly sparkly tomorrow. so, yesterday we did get the strong rally. 3.4% and they said it's based on the fed, but, you know, a lot of other people would say, look, it's short covering because people are removing their short-term bets that the market will continue to fall because we have some stability, but it will be a very interesting speech. i mean, essentially he's got to lay out why they got it wrong, why they thought there would be a rebound in the second half of the year which there won't be, why they will keep interest rates ultralow for two years and he'll lay out the options what they might do and that, of course, might probably involve restructuring the almost $2 trillion on the balance sheets and they'll buy data securities to force down interest rates what we call further out along
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the curve, but we're not expecting fireworks now or fireworks on friday at jackson hole in wyoming. >> bernanke speaking at jackson hole in wyoming. what do the markets look like now, simon? >> i think we'll go down 40 or 50 points at the open. it's holding patent. the important thing is we stabilize. we have that coming out of friday and what i think was quite clearly a short-covering rally yesterday. the market is looking for direction. and you could argue if it is betting that there will be something from ben bernanke on friday and they don't get it, they'll sell off and continue its route down, but who knows? we simply don't know. >> "the wall street journal" says it all "market bets on fed miracle waiting for friday." all right, simon, thanks so much. >> have a good day. pat summitt has been the fails face of women's basketball for four decades. yesterday she made a pretty stunning announcement. we'll have more on that when "morning joe" continues.
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♪ i think it's tough today to go back and figure what could have happened, what would have happened. we're dealing with the reality of what did happen, what did happen is he paid a heavy price for a momentary lapse of judgment that was not criminal, and at the end of the day now that the charges are dismissed, i think it's a statement to the world that in these cases including the media, i might add, that rushing to judgment is not a good idea and let the system play itself out. the presumption of innocence is an important concept in our country. >> the attorney for dominique strauss-khan speaking earlier this morning on "today." the manhattan district attorney has dismissed the sexual assault charges against the former imf
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chief. in a 12-minute hearing the nearly 3-month-old case came to a close yesterday. nbc's ron allen has more from lower manhattan. >> reporter: some 2 1/2 months after his shocking arrest, the man known worldwide as dsk left court a free man. but no longer head of the imf nor likely a french presidential candidate. in his first public statement after criminal charges were dropped, strauss-khan spoke only in french and says he was glad what he called the nightmare has over. "i'm relieved for my wife, for my children and everyone who supported me during this time" he said. prosecutors have taken the unusual step of asking the judge to throw out the case. saying they believe strauss-khan did have a sexual encounter with diallo, a housekeeper in this luxury new york hotel, but prosecutors say diallo made so many false and conflicting
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statements during their investigation they couldn't determine whether the sex was forced or consensual, adding there was no evidence of a violent attack. her attorney still insists she's still the victory of a crime. >> women who are raped and sexually assaulted should not have to go through some type of test to show that they lived a perfect life. >> reporter: in a last-ditch appeal diallo's attorney asked for a special prosecutor to take over, denied by two judges. diallo still has a civil lawsuit pending for an unspecified amount of money and damages, and so ends the lurid criminal case that riveted the public, from the perp walk to the luxury townhouse to the accuser publicly coming forward to demand justice after her credibility was publicly challenged and finally to strauss-khan walking away. but still facing dozens of protesters shouting at him.
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>> nbc's ron allen reporting there. governor dean, what's the lesson from all this? >> i think one of the lessons for the french is extradite people once in a while and you might -- your own people might be extradited or might be sent back. roman polanski was one of the reasons he was yanked off the first class cabin and taken away in chains because we believed -- i bet our law enforcement people believed based on the fact that the french refused to extradite a convicted child molester back to the united states that if dominique strauss-khan went back to france that would be the last anybody saw of him in america. and i -- so there's a lot of lessons here and i think the attorney did a fine job, innocent until proven guilty and all that. but you ought to think twice about what you're -- the problems you're setting up for your own citizens when you don't do the right thing in the extradition cases. >> also something to be learned about marching people in front of the camera. >> i'm not a big fan of that kind of stuff. other countries don't do it and i don't think we ought to do it
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either. that's part of the consequences of electing district attorneys. >> it's that image that could end his political in france. >> i don't think it's a bad thing his political career ended even though he wasn't a criminal or may not have been. he wouldn't have a political career in this country with that kind of behavior and he shouldn't have one over there. but the fact that the french refused to extradite a convicted child molester back to the united states has something to do with the way he was pulled off the plain unceremoniously. u.s. of tennessee women's basketball coach, pat summitt, one of the most respected coaches in all of sports made a surprising announcement yesterday -- >> throughout my career, i have always made it a point that my life and our basketball program were an open book. with that in mind, i have something to share with my tennessee family. earlier this year, the doctors at the mayo clinic diagnosed me with an early onset dementia, alzheimer's type at the age of
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59. i plan to continue to be your coach. >> coach summitt's photograph is on the front page of the "tennessean" in nashville. the impact of this news on the tennessee community is huge. for some perspective, this will be pat summitt's 38th season coaching the lady vols, in that time she's won 1,071 games, more than any other coach in college basketball, men or women. she's won eight national titles, just two fewer than legendary ucla coach jon wooden. and we'll be right back. [ male announcer ] get ready for the left lane. the volkswagen autobahn for all event is back. right now, get a great deal on new volkswagen models, including the jetta, awarded a top safety pick by the iihs. that's the power of german engineering. hurry in and lease the jetta s for just $179 a month. ♪ visit vwdealer.com today.
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a lot of people react differently an earthquake, like, down at city hall, mayor bloomberg felt the earthquake and he ran and looking for cover. and they found mayor bloomberg during the earthquake standing under his desk. it was crazy! >> oh, david that's a little -- that is -- >> they traced the epicenter of the earthquake to governor chris christie's aerobics class and -- no, no. they traced the epicenter of the earthquake to kim kardashian's honeymoon suite. >> now you're talking. >> boom! look, we got the east coast earthquake graphic, the whole thing. we're ready. so, we wanted to play for you some of the moments at 1:51 p.m. eastern time yesterday, what people were doing, what was happening when the earthquake hit. mineral, virginia, and then went out from there. here you go. >> you can see she's nearly
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ready. earthquake. >> what is it? >> it's an earthquake. >> this standard has protected -- i've been through earthquakes in seattle. >> i think we're having an earthquake, boys. we are having an earthquake. we just had a freaking earthquake. and it's -- there's another tremor. at 1:52, holy mackerel. that's my first. >> having a drink when the whole thing moved really, yeah. we're from england, and never actually experienced anything like that. >> omaha, you will see tranquil conditions, but kansas city -- why is everything shaking? look at the lights.
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let me get away from under here. >> just thought we'd take this opportunity to show you our new customer waiting room. feel that? >> what was that? >> that poor guy was shooting a furniture commercial in chantilly, virginia. the consensus around the table seems to be that the cy vance clip is the favorite among those. up next, what have we learned today? ♪ shake rattle and roll n: day care can be expensive. so to save some money, i found one that uses robots instead of real people. 'cuz robots work for free. robot 1:good morning... robot 1:...female child. sfx: modem dial-up noise
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time to tell you what we learned today, mr. dean, what did you learn today? >> i learned that we have an incredible counterintelligence organization that i knew nothing about in new york city. >> absolutely, working in conjunction with the cia. adrian fenty, what about you, sir? >> i learned that the east coast can withstand earthquakes. i'll get my t-shirt. >> you're a brave, brave man. katty kay? >> i learned that richard engel is cooler under fire than most people on the east coast are with a little minor tremor thing. >> good point. i also learned from richard engel that they're celebrating in tripoli by shooting rpgs into the air with no regard to the way the shrapnel might fall around them. celebrate wisely, our friends in libya, please. we'll see you back here tomorrow.
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